A student journal of arts, culture and politics at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago

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In Memoriam

fnewsbyway:

Photo by Patrick Reynolds

But still, there was the bird. Splayed out in the same spot between the buildings; unmoved for weeks and protected in plain sight from the destructive powers of sunlight and truck tires. Caught in the purgatory of the alley.

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Grad Student Kevin B Lee Gains Critical Acclaim for Transformers "Premake"

saic-graduate-studies:

On Friday, June 20 graduate student Kevin B. Lee presented Transformers: The Premake at the Nightingale. Although the twenty-five-minute-long YouTube video had premiered days prior to the viewing, Lee showed the film to a sold out audience.

Lee’s website describes the Premake as…

Rendered Ghosts

fnewsbyway:

image

"I am some different set of pixels, a spectrum of hex colors scattered in many guises within this once-removed universe."

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A bike ride on Damen with Google Glass by F Newsmagazine webmaster notandrewkaye
Photography by John Couch, through a Creative Commons license
Wright’s Right
by Jackie Dethorn
Frank Lloyd Wright is an interesting study in contrasts. One must ignore the many soap operas of his personal life and his generally unprofessional work life to give his career works a fair review. The Robie House, one of his most fascinating works, is nestled in what is today the Hyde Park campus of the University of Chicago.
Mr. Wright’s lack of attention to construction details is well-documented. Just a bit more iron in the cantilevers and more of his masterpieces would exist without massive reconstructions and/or bracing. Just a bit more pitch to flat roofs and balconies would accommodate the snows and rains of so many environments in the U.S. And perhaps with a basement or two, the destructive rising damp in concrete walls and wooden frames would be nonexistent. His use of special caning for the 176-plus art glass windows and doors in the Robie House is often blamed for the cool breezes that the early residents felt in the house during Chicago winters that can often be brutal.
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Photography by John Couch, through a Creative Commons license


Wright’s Right

by Jackie Dethorn


Frank Lloyd Wright is an interesting study in contrasts. One must ignore the many soap operas of his personal life and his generally unprofessional work life to give his career works a fair review. The Robie House, one of his most fascinating works, is nestled in what is today the Hyde Park campus of the University of Chicago.

Mr. Wright’s lack of attention to construction details is well-documented. Just a bit more iron in the cantilevers and more of his masterpieces would exist without massive reconstructions and/or bracing. Just a bit more pitch to flat roofs and balconies would accommodate the snows and rains of so many environments in the U.S. And perhaps with a basement or two, the destructive rising damp in concrete walls and wooden frames would be nonexistent. His use of special caning for the 176-plus art glass windows and doors in the Robie House is often blamed for the cool breezes that the early residents felt in the house during Chicago winters that can often be brutal.


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Students Prepare for the BFA Animation Showcase

Video by Coco Huang

Illustration by Meghan Ryan Morris
The Sound of One Man Thinking: A Conversation with Composer Alvin Lucierby Alyssa Moxley
Alvin Lucier (b 1931) composes within the subtle spaces of sound. Many of his pioneering works are simple, yet striking explorations of acoustical phenomena: the beating of interfering frequencies, the natural resonance of rooms, and the possibilities in the movement of speaker cones. In late March the MCA hosted a career retrospective of his works with performances by the International Contemporary Ensemble. F Newsmagazine met with the composer to talk about his way of working and teaching.
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Comic by Eric Garcia

SAIC professor and alum exhibits in New York

saic-graduate-studies:

image

Jan Tichy, Untitled, 2014, courtesy of the Fridman Gallery website

Current SAIC professor in the departments of Photography and Art & Technology and 2009 MFA graduate, Jan Tichy will be in New York this week in connection with two gallery events.

The first, on Wednesday June 11…

(via saic)

Teenage clicks: how gifs became the rebellious adolescent of the art world

by Berke Yazicioglu
Illustration by Meghan Ryan Morris
Hates Hateby Jessica Barrett Sattell

From round-the-clock breaking news coverage to a walk down the street, sometimes it feels like there is far more negativity than positivity in the world. We’re constantly on guard against crime, terror and violence, and other guises of hate seep into our day-to-day such as humiliating and pandering advertising or overhead snippets of verbally abusive conversations. Our own self-hate can even fuel our consumption to feed our insecurities.
A project from Bud Rodecker and Nick Adam that has been building since 2010 and transformed into a new website this week proves that “hate” is not just another four letter word. HatesHate addresses negativity through imagery that mimics the infamous anti-gay picket signs encouraged by the controversial Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps, political campaign posters or other forms of searing propaganda. Through repetition in the form of collaboration with visual communicators, “hate” is reconditioned into a statement of hope for a kinder world. To quote the statement from the project page:
“Natural learning for people happens through repetition. Hearing something often enough without challenge can eventually become truth. Unchallenged negativity is a profoundly destructive force capable of ill-effecting moments, environments, and lives. HatesHate is a simple visual response to the root of all things negative in the world. It’s an effort in repetition to redirect hate-filled messages towards a more compassionate truth.”Continue Reading

Illustration by Meghan Ryan Morris


Hates Hate


by Jessica Barrett Sattell

From round-the-clock breaking news coverage to a walk down the street, sometimes it feels like there is far more negativity than positivity in the world. We’re constantly on guard against crime, terror and violence, and other guises of hate seep into our day-to-day such as humiliating and pandering advertising or overhead snippets of verbally abusive conversations. Our own self-hate can even fuel our consumption to feed our insecurities.

A project from Bud Rodecker and Nick Adam that has been building since 2010 and transformed into a new website this week proves that “hate” is not just another four letter word. HatesHate addresses negativity through imagery that mimics the infamous anti-gay picket signs encouraged by the controversial Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps, political campaign posters or other forms of searing propaganda. Through repetition in the form of collaboration with visual communicators, “hate” is reconditioned into a statement of hope for a kinder world. To quote the statement from the project page:

“Natural learning for people happens through repetition. Hearing something often enough without challenge can eventually become truth. Unchallenged negativity is a profoundly destructive force capable of ill-effecting moments, environments, and lives. HatesHate is a simple visual response to the root of all things negative in the world. It’s an effort in repetition to redirect hate-filled messages towards a more compassionate truth.”


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Photo via
Wet Dreamsby Alexander WolffLast month at King Spa & Sauna in Niles, Illinois,  a Korean man wearing a leopard-print speedo named Mr. Lee scrubbed my naked body with a mesh washcloth and gave me a violently tender massage for $50. As uncomfortable as that may sound, it wasn’t.
Don’t let the ridiculous alternative medicine-esque explanations for all of their services deter you. King’s Spa is a wonderful, magical, place where you pay $25 to spend the entire day sitting in hot steam saunas, giant hot tubs, or exoticized dry saunas with goofy motifs. If you somehow get sick of that, you can eat a wide array of delicious Korean food in their sizable food-court, fall asleep on their finely upholstered recliners, or watch some random film in their movie theater. Last time I went the placard said they were showing, “Harry Potter and the Fire Goblet.”Continue Reading

Photo via


Wet Dreams


by Alexander Wolff

Last month at King Spa & Sauna in Niles, Illinois,  a Korean man wearing a leopard-print speedo named Mr. Lee scrubbed my naked body with a mesh washcloth and gave me a violently tender massage for $50. As uncomfortable as that may sound, it wasn’t.

Don’t let the ridiculous alternative medicine-esque explanations for all of their services deter you. King’s Spa is a wonderful, magical, place where you pay $25 to spend the entire day sitting in hot steam saunas, giant hot tubs, or exoticized dry saunas with goofy motifs. If you somehow get sick of that, you can eat a wide array of delicious Korean food in their sizable food-court, fall asleep on their finely upholstered recliners, or watch some random film in their movie theater. Last time I went the placard said they were showing, “Harry Potter and the Fire Goblet.”


Continue Reading

Screaming in Metalanguage: An interview with Avant-Garde Japanese Poetry Translator David Michael Ramirez II
by Jessica Barrett SattellDavid Michael Ramirez II is a Seattle-based Japanese-English translator with a PhD in Japan Studies from Osaka University. His first published work, Lizard Telepathy, Fox Telepathy, a collection of surrealist poems by Osaka avant-garde poet, photographer, gallery owner, and musician Yoshinori Henguchi, hits bookstores soon. For Ramirez, translating these poems concerning the fluidity of Japanese language became a rediscovery of what it is about art that “makes his heart to begin anew.”
Jessica Barrett Sattell: You grew up in California. What about Japan piqued your interest and inspired you to live, study and work there?
David Michael Ramirez II: I think my dad had a secret agenda to get me interested in Japan. We watched shows together like Shogun and he took me to see movies like Ran. We also had a Japanese student stay with us for a year when I was five. She smoked and wore a wig, and gave me a broken lighter to play with, which I thought was amazing.

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Screaming in Metalanguage: An interview with Avant-Garde Japanese Poetry Translator David Michael Ramirez II


by Jessica Barrett Sattell


David Michael Ramirez II is a Seattle-based Japanese-English translator with a PhD in Japan Studies from Osaka University. His first published work,
 
Lizard Telepathy, Fox Telepathya collection of surrealist poems by Osaka avant-garde poet, photographer, gallery owner, and musician Yoshinori Henguchi, hits bookstores soon. For Ramirez, translating these poems concerning the fluidity of Japanese language became a rediscovery of what it is about art that “makes his heart to begin anew.”


Jessica Barrett Sattell
: You grew up in California. What about Japan piqued your interest and inspired you to live, study and work there?

David Michael Ramirez II: I think my dad had a secret agenda to get me interested in Japan. We watched shows together like Shogun and he took me to see movies like Ran. We also had a Japanese student stay with us for a year when I was five. She smoked and wore a wig, and gave me a broken lighter to play with, which I thought was amazing.

Continue Reading

Illustration by Magdalena Wistuba
Patterns of the Readymade: Negotiating Histories in Contemporary Practiceby Henry Harris
In critique or discourse, conversations on an artwork often include some type of brief origin story. The hope is to reveal a little bit of the maker’s intentions. These dialogues will, more often than not, include the phrase: “I found ______ / I saw _______ and really liked how it _________.” What is of note here is the mention of discovery, the mining of a special material or process, and the genius to be found in the small gesture of placing it in the context of a piece and possibly exhibiting it later on. This is quietly heroic.
The same is true in the usage of “the readymade” in contemporary artworks. It seems to be as prevalent as ever in both image- and object-making practices. But, it also seems that contemporary usage of the readymade, and the object or image’s inherent histories, can easily fall into discernible patterns.

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